Attorney Bruno Fagali Sheds Light On Some Laws Around The World

Bruno Fagali works for Nova / SB as their corporate integrity manager. He also owns his own law firm, Fagali Advocacy. He was born in Sao Paulo and continues to live there today. He has built up a team of lawyers at his practice that has specialties in such legal areas election laws, anti-corruption, compliance, advertising, public law, and parliamentary law. His goal is to offer his clients that highest levels of service and a commitment to working for their best interests at all times.

Bruno Fugal is a champion of compliance integrity program. Starting off his career at the prestigious Pontifical Catholic University, Bruno Fagali majored in law. After that, he joined the University of Sao Paulo to advance his education. On the Fagali Advocacy website, Bruno Fagali operates a blog, called Fagaspress, where he keeps people informed about various legal matters. One recent article of his details what he calls the “Photoshop Alert” law. The specific law he addressed was the one in France which requires any picture that has been digitally retouched to have a warning on it informing people that is the case. The law was enshrined in French Decree 2017-738, he says, and it now makes up part of the French Code of Public Health.

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Bruno Fagali says that the reason for this law, and similar ones that might be passed in other nations, is that these retouched images generally show figures that are for all intents and purposes unobtainable by actual people. This has a very negative health effect, particularly on young women, who are striving to obtain a body-type they see in ads all the time that they just can’t have. Somewhere around 30,000 to 40,000 people in France suffer from anorexia and many of them have died of this.

Another legal matter that Bruno Fagali posted an article about had to do with grocery stores slapping their names and logos on their grocery bags. Bruno says that there is a Brazilian law outlining when this is ok to do and when it isn’t. He said that it is fine if grocery stores do this if they are handing out the bags for free. However, he says if they are charging for the bag then it must be free of advertising by law.

The thinking behind this law, Bruno Fagali says, is that company’s shouldn’t be able to charge for bags and then on top of that have free advertising as shoppers leave the store with branded bags in hand. This law is now part of the Consumer Protection Code which provides protection against misleading and/or abusive ad practices.

Learn more bout Bruno Fagali: https://www.terra.com.br/noticias/dino/bruno-fagali-fala-sobre-compliance-atualmente-uma-das-principais-responsabilidades-da-governanca-corporativa,da7796c2023b08e3ba5b3e4207d580dffb81cxb8.html

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